The quick answer: no.

You may be surprised to learn that mosquitoes are always hanging around, even in the winter months. It’s likely, however, that we won’t see them in December and January – with the exception of those unseasonably warm Florida days.

Many mosquitoes make it through the winter months by remaining in the larval stage. Female mosquitoes lay eggs toward the end of the fall, and those eggs will remain dormant until spring. The eggs are carefully placed in damp soil and will not hatch until conditions become favorable again – when the temperature rises and plenty of rain begins to fall.

There are even quite a few species of mosquitoes that can live as adults through winter. Once again, it’s the female mosquito that does all of the work in keeping the species alive.

At the end of the fall, the mosquitoes mate and the males die off. The females remain alive by hiding in protected areas such as hollow or damp logs, garages or even doghouses. Once the warm weather comes rolling back in, the re-awakened females emerge from their hiding places in search of food in the form of blood. This is why we are so often bitten by mosquitoes in spring and early summer.

To avoid an overwhelming number of hungry mosquitoes come springtime, winter months are time to take action. Here are some things you can do to reduce the number of mosquitoes that are able to make it back when the warm weather does:

  • Empty any standing water that collects in tarps, toys, birdbaths, gutters, machinery and pots.
  • When we near the warmer months, add round cakes of bacteria called mosquito dunks to ponds and pools of water. These cakes will dissolve and kill any mosquito larvae that were left during the winter.

Even though you may not see them as often as in the summer, mosquitoes are always there. Try not to let your guard down and keep an eye out for them all year long, especially here in Florida where winter is warm. If you have trouble keeping them at bay, feel free to contact Florida Pest Control for a no obligation inspection.